crumpled atlanta: glenridge hall





“THE STORY
Thomas K. Glenn, a pillar of Atlanta business in the early 20th Century, built this estate in 1929 on 400 acres of farmland north of Atlanta. Designed by Samuel Inman Cooper, the Tudor Revival mansion required 60 men and a calendar year to complete. The property also included stables, barns, smith and carpentry shops, and housing for workers. Thomas and his wife, Elizabeth lived at Glenridge until his death in 1946. Beginning in the 1980s, T.K. Glenn’s granddaughter and her husband fought to preserve the house and its setting. Glenridge Hall was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 and the couple thoroughly restored the home with the dream that it be available for the public to enjoy. The home has hosted many charitable events and retreats over the years and has been used in films such as Driving Miss Daisy and, most recently, The Vampire Diaries.

THE THREAT
Of the original 400 acres, only approximately 80 acres remain as part of the Glenridge property. In the summer of 2014, that acreage was placed up for sale. Because of its location (just west of Georgia 400 and bisected by Abernathy Road), large-scale commercial development highly likely. At this time, there are no protections for Glenridge Hall that would keep the home from being significantly altered, or even demolished, and its surrounding property inappropriately developed. Conservation easements and other tax incentives could help preserve this beautiful home and grounds.” 
-from the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation

Atlanta is grieving over last week’s demolition of the beautiful 1929 Tudor Revival mansion, Glenridge Hall.